jarrodwhaley.com

I make films. I'm also a nerd.

Posts in technology:

Stop It, RIM, You’re Embarrassing Everyone

Just look at this garbage. I’ll bet you close the window the second the talking begins.

This is all the proof you need–outside of using one of their devices–in order to understand just how quickly RIM and Blackberry are swirling down the shitter.

Paul Miller is Leaving the Internet For One Year…

…but he’s still going to write about technology. I have to say, I’ve considered doing the same more than a few times.

It’s Time to Close the Curtains to Google’s Beady Eyes

I’ve been using DuckDuckGo exclusively for my Web searches for a few days. It’s fast, it returns highly relevant results, and the company cares about privacy. Something about Google seems to have hit a tipping point lately. Their newly unified privacy policy and the “search plus your world” business just provide further evidence that Google is a creep. We’ll leave the fact that their search results are often full of useless cruft out of this, for now.

Let me make something clear: I never used to worry much about online privacy. Google just wanted to show me ads that more closely aligned to my interests, right? There’s a nice (if snarky) distillation of that point of view over at Adweek:

Can somebody please tell America that advertisers don’t wake up in the morning and perv-search terms in order to start some office betting pool on who you’ll be dating next?

While I agree with Ms. Cullers’ assertion that advertisers aren’t as a general rule concerned about our private peccadillos (barring the odd exception, naturally), I still find it more than a little creepy to think that there’s a massive database of info about every tiny little thing I’ve been interested in since the turn of the millennium. Maybe Google (or the government) won’t use it against me, but it’s still there. We don’t use nuclear weapons very often, but they’re out there, and they suck.

If you’re still on the fence, DuckDuckGo’s privacy policy is a pretty convincing document.


UPDATE, June 29, 2013 12:50 PM: We certainly have a new perspective on privacy now, don’t we?

What’s a Name Worth?

Some people will do anything for a WWDC ticket:

WWDC tickets are non transferable this year, so naturally I’m willin to legally change my name to yours in order to buy your ticket. To sweeten the deal I will perform the following duties on your behalf for one year:
– Jury duty
– DMV license/registration
– Any of your court ordered community service up to 40 hours
– Visit your senile grandfather once a month
If your name happens to be Jebodiah there is an extra $500 bonus.

–via Daring Fireball.

Brown Sheep

Doesn’t “standing out from the herd” when it comes to a mobile phone just mean that you’re the only one who bought that phone?

Project Ass

Let me just come out and say it: some gadgets are stupid. I’ve been wrong about gadgets before–very, very wrong in some cases–but I just can’t see myself wearing these stupid Google HUD glasses. Do I really want Google to be able to show me Charmin ads while I’m in the bathroom?

The Future Is Retro

And I’d recommend checking it out if that link didn’t point to one of those damned idiotic pageview-pimping “slideshow” articles.

Maryland Stands Up to Employer Nosiness

Way to go, Maryland:

Maryland has become the first state to pass a law banning employers from asking for social media passwords. […] Illinois and California have both introduced similar pieces of legislation, and senators from New York and Connecticut have both asked the US Attorney General to prohibit this practice.

If this whole thing is new to you, see also: this and this

There Is No Digital Ozymandias

Matt Pearce on the ephemeral nature of our digital memories (via a lament of photography’s devaluation in the post-smartphone world for The New Iquiry):

Every picture you upload, every cheap memory tweeted from your friend’s backyard into digital eternity, is also tied to some tendon or ankle of hardware in a faraway warehouse that corporate security would never let you enter. This is risk. Someday these places will be destroyed — by bombs, by cranes, by floods, by history, by all the kinds of things we tend to photograph — and the images will be gone if they’re not also fastened to the world somewhere else. Perhaps you’ll care; perhaps you’re dead by then and won’t.

Do A Little Quick Googling Next Time

Digital sample rates and sonic wave frequencies are not the same thing, you schmuck. It’s sad how much work went into this piece given the completely false premise at its foundation.